Editorial: Charities need help to help others

Editorial: IT'S hard to fathom that many people in our community have as little as $18 a day to live on.

This measly sum is expected to cover food, health, medical, clothing, education, entertainment and utility costs.

And there is no such thing as disposable income for these people.

The new report released by the Salvation Army shows that 56% of people involved in the 2015 Economic and Social Impact Survey (ESIS) were worse off financially than last year.

What's alarming is that 57% of people had gone without meals and 34% of parents could not afford to give their children fresh fruit or vegetables daily.

And although the Salvation Army are helping as many people as they can, they are in the awkward position of being unable to help everyone.

It's hard enough for some people to have to ask for help in the first place, let alone be turned away.

Unfortunately, I'm not sure what the answer is.

Obviously more funding to help these charities would be a good start, so they are in a position to help the most vulnerable people in our society.