Former Mackay woman assault three people in an Andergrove chemist.
Former Mackay woman assault three people in an Andergrove chemist.

‘It’s not like I belong to the mongrel mob’

A FORMER Mackay woman proclaimed "it's not like I belong to the mongrel mob" as she justified why she bit two pharmacy workers and belted the owner of a dog she claimed attacked her.

Petrina Catherine Erskine said she had been on her own property when a random woman's dog bit her.

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Mackay District Court heard the 50 year old had been at United Chemists Andergrove on May 22 last year when the dog's owner walked by.

Erskine assaulted the woman and then bit two workers on the hand when they tried to intervene.

"I think the fact that upsets me the most is that I've had a lifetime of a career, and because someone can't keep their dog contained and (then) I go have a mental moment and smack her," she said over videolink from Ipswich.

"It's not like I belong to the mongrel mob.

"I'm just sorry it ever happened.

"I had a moment of absolute frustration and anger because I was on my own property and this lady's dog attacked me.

Petrina Erskine said she had been attacked by the woman’s dog.
Petrina Erskine said she had been attacked by the woman’s dog.

"I had never met the lady, I didn't know the lady, nothing.

"And I just happened to be in that chemist and someone had given me a description of her and she walked past."

She pleaded guilty to three counts of assault occasioning bodily harm.

The court heard Erskine had led a blameless life until that day with 20 years as a social working.

Judge Deborah Richards considered the most appropriate penalty given the circumstances and that Erskine needed to return to New Zealand to have surgery after being hit by a car years ago.

She was able to have the surgery done for free but there was a time crunch.

The court heard the issue was if a conviction was recorded, Erskine may not be able to return to Australia.

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And, at the moment, anyone returning to Australia needs to provide $2500 to cover quarantine costs.

"I accept that this is not something that you usually do," Judge Richards said.

"And I accept that you're not a member of the mongrel mob."

Judge Richards said taking in all the factors "of this rather unusual case" the most appropriate penalty was a $1000 fine. Convictions were not recorded.