Legal high left woman ‘paralysed’

Canisters of ­nitrous oxide gas are legal and give users a quick high. Picture: Nathan Richter
Canisters of ­nitrous oxide gas are legal and give users a quick high. Picture: Nathan Richter

A heavily tattooed Brisbane woman claims inhaling whipped cream chargers filled with nitrous oxide left her "paralysed from the waist down".

Tamika Dudley said she began using "nangs" regularly as a "fun high'' after trying them for the first time last year.

"I would be doing them before clubbing, at kick-ons, when friends would come over, when I was bored," she wrote on Facebook.

Inhaling the gas from a balloon after a charger has been cracked, nang users usually get a quick rush of euphoria and a head rush sensation that lasts a couple of minutes.

Tamika Dudley said she began using ‘nangs’ regularly. Picture: Facebook
Tamika Dudley said she began using ‘nangs’ regularly. Picture: Facebook

The canisters are available in many convenience stores, with packs selling for as little as $6.

However, Ms Dudley said the quick legal high landed her in hospital after a nang hit left her unable to feel her legs and arms in May last year.

Ms Dudley, who made headlines in 2017 when footage emerged of her obscenity-laden rant at a cab driver, said she had suffered severe nerve damage from using nangs.

She said doctors were unaware of what had happened to her when she arrived. She had to undergo multiple tests, including an MRI, CT scan, and lumber puncture.

The next morning she claims she was paralysed from the waist down.

On Facebook, she wrote that she later discovered she had severely damaged her nerves due to long-term vitamin B12 depletion, caused by nitrous oxide use.

"That honestly was the scariest most frightening thing I have ever experienced, knowing you can't walk," she said. "Knowing you might never walk for the rest of your life. it's like your whole life has been taken away from you.

Ms Dudley said she was left paralysed from the waist down. Picture: Facebook
Ms Dudley said she was left paralysed from the waist down. Picture: Facebook

"I was scared I was going to be a vegetable in a wheelchair forever."

A couple of days passed, but Ms Dudley wasn't improving, despite being given B12 every day.

Ms Dudley said she spent two months trapped in a hospital bed, where he couldn't feed herself and her mother would break down in tears as she watched her daughter attempt to hold a spoon.

"I was bed ridden and sh***ing and p***ing in a pan," she said.

She regained movement in her arms and legs with physiotherapy and after two months she was able to walk again with the help of nurses.

After three months she was able to walk on her own. However, she said she still has sensitivity in her toes and her fingers are still not back to normal.

She said she wanted to share her story to warn others of the risk associated with nangs.

"Not once in my head did I think 'this is going to make me paralysed' or f**k 'I might end up like a vegetable forever' not once did it cross my mind Because you don't think that's going to happen to you," she said.

The canisters cost as little as $6 a pack. Picture: AAP Image/Sam Wundke
The canisters cost as little as $6 a pack. Picture: AAP Image/Sam Wundke

"I need you guys to know Nangs are not SAFE. These things can ruin your life forever."

In 2017, Ms Dudley made headlines when she posted a tirade to her thousands of Snapchat followers after a cab driver wasn't sure how to get to her destination.

"I put in the GPS, so follow the GPS. What's so hard? What's so f***ing hard about following the GPS?" she said in the clip.

"You picked me up and you're a cab driver and you're telling me to get out because you don't know where you're going?

"I swear to God, if you get lost again, there's gonna be a lot of trouble so make sure you know where you're going, swear to f***ing God."

 

 

 

 

She first tried them last year. Picture: Facebook
She first tried them last year. Picture: Facebook
She has now learned how to walk again. Picture: Facebook
She has now learned how to walk again. Picture: Facebook

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