Disorder and confusion should not overshadow the threat that causes them.
Disorder and confusion should not overshadow the threat that causes them.

OPINION: Panicking is the enemy of prudence

PANIC is not precaution when it comes to the pandemic on everyone’s lips.

Conflicting interests are at play about town, and the reasonable choice is not to aggravate tensions between them.

Of course, everybody’s policy is prudence. But that policy must extend to the largest practical demographic and it must include patience.

Every organisation has its own employees to consider. Schools have children. Towns have residents. Protective guidelines do not imply the sky is falling, nor does the sight of doctors wearing face masks.

Any mention of preventive measures risks roiling calm waters. But to not discuss and implement such policies would be negligent, since the priority is to slow potential new infections.

However inconvenient, self-quarantine and orderly clinic queues are not too much to ask in service of safety and health.

The helter-skelter approach is irresponsible. Remember that those truly at risk are a specific, slim slice of the populace: people older than 70.

It is necessary to test people. But call ahead for an appointment.

That the greater concern of health authorities is not an actual illness, but is adults misbehaving, should embarrass the most ­severe hypochondriac.