IS THERE A DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE? Sixty medical and allied health students came to Emerald Hospital eager to learn about rural doctoring.
IS THERE A DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE? Sixty medical and allied health students came to Emerald Hospital eager to learn about rural doctoring. Kaitlyn Gutzke Ememedstudents

Real-life training for students the best at Emerald Hospital

WITH stethoscopes around their necks and notepads in their hands, 60 medical and allied health students made their way through the halls of the Emerald Hospital.

 

As part of the annual Joint Rural Health Club weekend from May 3-6, second and third-year students from four Queensland universities were given the opportunity to gain exposure to regional health practice.

"The overall objective is to provide an opportunity for health students to gain exposure to the academic and social aspects of practising health in a rural setting," director of nursing Louisa Dufty said.

"Attendees also met current practising rural health professionals, learnt skills in a rural setting, gained exposure to a variety of disciplines and participated in activities promoting the rural lifestyle."

The students were challenged in eight skills stations.

Second-year UQ student Geraldo Guimaraes said the weekend had been invaluable.

"This has been an incredible opportunity," he said.

"These are skills that more often than not you will never get to practice because they are very difficult to get people to co-ordinate."

The students were bought to Emerald by Health Workforce Queensland.